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"Three Boats Watercolor 1913 26x25" by Paul Signac - New Listing
  • Three Boats Watercolor 1913 26x25 Watercolor by Paul Signac
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  • "Three Boats Watercolor 1913 26x25"

    1913

    Paul Signac

    Watercolor
    Drawing, Watercolor

    Size: 26.5x25.5 in  |  67x65 cm

    Framed: 0x0 in  |  0x0 cm

     
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    LISTING INFO
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    ARTIST BIO
    Hand Signed : Signed By Artist
    Condition: Excellent
    Framed without Glass : Antique Framed
    Purchased from : Other 1914
    Provenance / History :
    Story / Additional Info :
    Certificate of Authenticity : Not Authenticated
    LID : 137178
    Paul Signac

    Art Brokerage: Paul Signac French Artist: b. 1863 - 1935. Paul Signac followed a course of training in architecture before deciding at the age of 18 to pursue a career as a painter after attending an exhibit of Monet's work. He sailed around the coasts of Europe, painting the landscapes he encountered. He also painted a series of watercolors of French harbor cities in later years. Many of Signac's paintings are of the French coast. He loved to paint the water. He left the capital each summer, to stay in the south of France in the village of Collioure or at St. Tropez, where he bought a house and invited his friends. Signac loved sailing and began to travel in 1892, sailing a small boat to almost all the ports of France, to Holland, and around the Mediterranean as far as Constantinople, basing his boat at St. Tropez, which he "discovered". From his various ports of call, Signac brought back vibrant, colorful watercolors, sketched rapidly from nature. From these sketches, he painted large studio canvases that are carefully worked out in small, mosaic-like squares of color, quite different from the tiny, variegated dots previously used by Seurat. Signac himself experimented with various media. As well as oil paintings and watercolors he made etchings, lithographs, and many pen-and-ink sketches composed of small, laborious dots. The neo-impressionists influenced the next generation: Signac inspired Henri Matisse and André Derain in particular, thus playing a decisive role in the evolution of Fauvism. As president of the Société des Artistes Indépendants from 1908 until his death, Signac encouraged younger artists (he was the first to buy a painting by Matisse) by exhibiting the controversial works of the Fauves and the Cubists.